ITA Jay Cross Memorial Award 2019

The Internet Time Alliance Award, in memory of Jay Cross, is presented to a workplace learning professional who has contributed in positive ways to the field of Informal Learning and is reflective of Jay’s lifetime of work.

Recipients champion workplace and social learning practices inside their organization and/or on the wider stage. They share their work in public and often challenge conventional wisdom. The Award is given to professionals who continuously welcome challenges at the cutting edge of their expertise and are convincing and effective advocates of a humanistic approach to workplace learning and performance.

We announce the award on 5 July, Jay’s birthday.

Following his death in November 2015, the partners of the Internet Time Alliance (Jane Hart, Harold Jarche, Charles Jennings, Clark Quinn) resolved to continue Jay’s work. Jay Cross was a deep thinker and a man of many talents, never resting on his past accomplishments, and this award is one way to keep pushing our professional fields and industries to find new and better ways to learn and work.

The Internet Time Alliance Jay Cross Memorial Award for 2019 is presented to Michelle Ockers.

Michelle describes herself as “passionate about modernising learning in organisations”. She has experience supporting workplace learning inside large organizations as well as a freelance consultant. Michelle helps to inform the industry through her public speaking and workshops. She is not afraid to try new methods and get her hands dirty, as she did in promoting social learning at Coca Cola Amatil, trading in her sneakers for safety shoes to better understand the work environment. For the past year Michelle has been posting a monthly summary of “What I learned”, setting an example of continuous learning.

Here is Michelle in her own words:

“The idea of a learning environment is that you’re reducing friction, to make it easier for people to learn, and in particular to learn while they work … So it’s about enabling people to learn continuously, to have a more fluid sharing of knowledge, to be able to access the resources they need, in the flow of work and to be able to do their job.”

It is with great pleasure that we present the fourth annual Internet Time Alliance Jay Cross Memorial Award to Michelle Ockers. Michelle will be presented with the award in the city of Brisbane where she now lives.

ITA Jay Cross Memorial Award

The Internet Time Alliance Award, in memory of Jay Cross, is presented to a workplace learning professional who has contributed in positive ways to the field of Real Learning and is reflective of Jay’s lifetime of work.

Recipients champion workplace and social learning practices inside their organization and/or on the wider stage. They share their work in public and often challenge conventional wisdom. The Award is given to professionals who continuously welcome challenges at the cutting edge of their expertise and are convincing and effective advocates of a humanistic approach to workplace learning and performance.

We announce the award each year on 5 July, Jay’s birthday.

Following his death in November 2015, the partners of the Internet Time Alliance resolved to continue Jay’s work. Jay Cross was a deep thinker and a man of many talents, never resting on his past accomplishments, and this award is one way to keep pushing our professional fields and industries to find new and better ways to learn and work.

2018

The Internet Time Alliance Jay Cross Memorial Award for 2018 was presented to Mark Britz.

Mark has experience both inside and outside organizations and has focused on improving workplace performance. He questions conventional beliefs about organizational development and has championed better ways to work and learn in the emerging networked workplace. Mark is currently the Senior Manager of Programming at the eLearning Guild as well as a Service Partner with the 70:20:10 Institute. He was an early adopter of using social media for onboarding and has long been active on social media, contributing to the global conversation on improving workplace learning.

“Culture, the most powerful presence in your organization, is only learned socially & informally. Social Media spreads your culture quickly … for better or worse”@britz (2012)

More recently, Mark wrote about learning at work.

“If we want real learning in organizations we must get back to the core of how and where people learn, and what moves us most. Simply, much learning happens in our work and with others. Organizations/leadership would do well then to have more strategic conversations about how to create more space, more opportunity, and more connection rather than more courses, classes and content.”

2017

The Internet Time Alliance Jay Cross Memorial Award for 2017 was presented to Marcia Conner.

Marcia was an early leader in the movement for individual and social learning, and an innovator. As a Senior Manager at Microsoft, she developed new training practices and wrote an accessible white paper on the deeper aspects of learning design. She subsequently was the Information Futurist at PeopleSoft. She also served as a co-founder and editor at Learnativity, an early online magazine.

Marcia co-organized and co-hosted the Creating a Learning Culture conference at the Darden School of Business at the University of Virginia, leading to a book of the same title. As an advocate for the power of learning, alone and together, she wrote Learn More Now and co-wrote The New Social Learning (now in its second edition) with Tony Bingham of the Association for Talent Development. She also was the instigator who organized the team for the twitter chat #lrnchat, which continues to this day.

Marcia’s a recognized leader, writing for Fast Company, and keynoting conferences around the world. She currently helps organizations go beyond their current approaches, changing their culture. She’s also in the process of moving her focus beyond organizations, to society. In her words, “I’m in pursuit of meaningful progress, with good faith and honesty, girded by what I know we are capable of doing right now. When we assemble all that is going on at the edges of culture, technology, and (dare I say) business, we find a wildly hopeful view of the future. People doing extraordinary things, on a human scale, that has the potential to change everything for the better.”

Marcia was a friend of Jay’s for many years (including organizing the creation of his Wikipedia page), and we’re proud to recognize her contributions.

2016

The Internet Time Alliance Jay Cross Memorial Award for 2016 was presented to Helen Blunden.

Helen has been an independent practitioner at Activate Learning since 2014. Her vision is to help people stay current in a constantly changing world of work and do this by working and sharing their work and learning in a generous, open, and authentic manner. Helen started her career within the Royal Australian Navy across two branches (Training Development and Public Relations) as well as working within Service and external to Service (with Air Force and Army and Defence civilians), then with the Reserves. Helen later worked as a Learning and Development Consultant for Omni Asia Pacific, and subsequently with National Australia Bank as a Social Learning Consultant. Helen is an active blogger and is engaged professionally on various social media platforms.

Here is Helen in her own words: “In my observations, it’s not only learning teams in organisations or institutions that need to change and recreate the traditional ways of training into learning experiences. It’s wider than that. I have smaller businesses, some of whom are vendors who offer training products and services to the public or to organisations who are scratching their heads trying to figure out how to get ‘into the 21st century’ as their clients ask for more blended programs – shorter programs – but still achieve the same outcomes. Dare I say it, the tools that Jane Hart offers as tools for professional development are not for learning people alone – they’re for everyone. This is where I’m grappling to understand the enormity of the change and how, for the first time, you’re not only helping a client design and develop the learning experience – but you need to teach them how to use the tools so it becomes part of their social behaviour to build their own business, brand and reputation.”